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Walailak University is located in Nakhon Si Thammarat province, southern Thailand.The GPS lacation is 8 ˚ 38.145' N and 99 ˚54.090 ' E, which is far from Bangkok around 780 km. The campus has an area approximately 14.4 km2 (1,440 ha), which is the largest campus among Thai universities. The campus is located around 3 km apart from sea (The gulf of Thailand) to the east, and around 25 km from granitic rock mountain to the west. The area has an average cumulative rainfall of 2,798 mm/year. Half of the total rain fall between November to December, so flooding may occur in some year during this peroid. The lowest rainfall and also highest temperature of the year tend to occur during February to April. Temperature of the area varies in a narrow range between 21 - 34 ˚C, with an average of 27 ˚C.

 

Nakhon Si Thammarat province has a long history of Buddhist city. A big Buddhist pagoda was builded in 311 AD, and it became the center of the province since then. The province had various names in the past including Pataliputra, Locae, Sirithamnakhon, Muthalingkom, Tampornling, Suwanputra Lakhon and Ligor, most of them are old Indian words. Ligor was called by French surveyers who came to this area during Ayuttaya peroid. The present name may derived from name of the first Dynasty governed this province. A Japanese samurai, - Yamada Nakamasa used to be a governor of the province during Ayuttaya peroid. There are 1,513,991 population in 2010, 93.6 % of them are Buddhist, 5.8 % are Muslim, and the remains 0.6 % are Christian.

 

Total land area of the province is 994,250 ha, and 489,993 ha is agricultural area. The largest part of the agricultural area (260,725 ha) is used for growing stand trees such as rubber, oil palm and tropical fruit trees. Rice field share for 33.9 % (166,351 ha), and the remain are annual crops, vegetable, flowers and gress land. Shrimp cultivation in the province was started around 1990. There are 4,000 farms which cover an cultivation area of 8,115 ha in 2005, but it rapidly declined to 2,831 ha in 2010.